Meet Our Interns

RMC Research New York offers three opportunities (Spring, Summer, Fall) for undergraduate and graduate students to serve as Education Policy and Program Interns. The Education Policy and Programs Intern works closely with Research Associates and Research Assistants to conduct research and analyze local, state, and federal legislation and policies relating to P-12 education. Highlighted below are our Education Policy and Program Interns and their experience at RMC Research New York.



Summer 2015 Interns


Megan Rafferty
arrow

Megan Rafferty

Summer 2015 Intern
close
info:


Megan Rafferty, 2015 New York University, Social and Cultural Analysis

Education Policy and Programs Intern

I am a senior at New York University studying Social and Cultural Analysis.

An Internship Q&A

Describe your internship at RMC Research-New York. What are the types of research activities that you have been involved with?

    At RMC Research-New York my internship experience has allowed me to learn from Research Associates and Assistants on wide-ranging projects; some examples include designing engagement strategies for an online course, vetting educational resources for caregivers, and connecting with cultural institutions throughout New York to collect valuable lesson plans and activities for educators. I am also collaborating with another intern to produce an informational video highlighting RMC Research-New York’s exciting projects.

    What are the most rewarding aspects of your experience as an intern at RMC Research-New York?

      Gaining experience with parent-, educator-, and learner-focused websites is very rewarding; I know that each addition or improvement I can offer to implement on a website can immediately be used in the real world to improve education in a community. I also appreciate the support and generosity of everyone at RMC: getting to learn not only about what each person here does but also about how they came to RMC and why they’re passionate about education has been immensely rewarding as I consider my own future.

      Why did you choose to intern at RMC Research-New York? What factored into your search and applying?

        I was immediately fascinated by a posting about the internship at RMC Research-New York because it described a really exciting opportunity that I had had no idea even existed. While I’ve always been interested in education, I didn’t know any way of experiencing an education-related field besides becoming a teacher. Reading the description of an opportunity that would use my strengths in researching and writing, in a field that I love, with the chance to ultimately work in education beyond teaching, felt like it was too good to be true.

        What resources did you use to search for the internship at RMC Research-New York (i.e. LinkedIn, social media, networking, faculty)?

          I found the internship at RMC Research-New York through NYU’s online job postings.

          How is the internship experience at RMC Research-New York complementing your academic experience at New York University?

            In my classwork at NYU I conduct a fair amount of research and often read large amounts of information, then condense it into what’s important and relevant to a question. That work, while interesting, is almost exclusively theoretical; in class we spend much more time discussing how and why problems exist than we do discussing concrete, practical solutions. As an intern at RMC Research-New York, I still use research and existing background information, but with one important difference: here, I apply that knowledge to create concrete, practical solutions to problems and needs within education. Moving from the theoretical into the practical has been an important step in identifying how my academic experience can be put to use in the real world.

            How is the internship at RMC Research-New York influencing your career interests, goals, or plans?

              First and foremost, interning at RMC Research-New York has opened my eyes to a whole realm of jobs that I never knew existed. The field of educational consulting and the field of educational technology are both exciting new possibilities for my career, and I’m lucky enough to be learning about them here during an internship where I can ask any and all questions not only about RMC’s work but about the field as a whole.

              Is the internship at RMC Research-New York providing you with real-world experience? If so, how?

                I’m gaining real-world experience in the implementation of RMC’s state and federal contracts; I’m assisting in the creation of products and projects that may ultimatelyl be used in the real world; I’m learning technical skills that can be used in a range of situations; and I’m encouraged to produce my own writing which may be published. Every project is directly applicable to the real world - actual projects important to RMC, not just minor tasks delegated to the interns - and with each project I learn something new and valuable.

                What advantage(s) has the internship at RMC Research-New York provided you as a future job or graduate school applicant?

                  Very concretely, the internship at RMC Research-New York is providing me with published writing samples, valuable technical skills, and examples of projects that I can show potential employers as proof of what I’ve learned and what I’m capable of. I’ve also gained less concrete but equally important knowledge: how to develop a project with minimal guidelines by focusing on creating the best possible outcome, how to work within a team to critique work in order to improve it, and how to manage multiple projects with varying deadlines and ensure that each project gets the time it deserves. And being able to share lessons from an internship that I really enjoyed will make it clear in any interview that I’m excited about what I do and committed to improving.

                  What advice would you give to future Education Policy and Programs interns to help them make the most of their internship experience at RMC Research-New York?

                    If you have a question about something - even if it’s not directly related to the activity you’re doing - ask. If you’re interested in learning a new skill, ask. If you have the chance to interview everyone in the office about their work and their personal choices, do it. Everyone here is willing to talk to you about why they’re here and what they do here, and it’s only going to help you learn more.